Cutting machine block

Abstract

Claims

Sept. 3, 1935. G. B. BRlTToN Z3550 CUTTING MACHINE BLOCK Fi1ed`Apri1v 2o, 1954 2 sheets-sheet 1 .9 INVEN'roR 9 ."3 5 @L5/wv 5. BR/Tro/v I 4j I I BY y @Qq ATTO RN EYS G B. BRITTON 2,013,550 CUTTING MACHINE BLOCK Filed April 2o, 1954 2 sheets-sheet 2 Sept. 3, 1935.- INVENTOR GLEN/v B. BR/'Trav ATTORNEYS Patented Sept. 3, 1935 CUTTING MACHINE BLOCK' GlennlB. Britton, Hannibal, Mo., assignor tok In-A ternational Shoe Company, St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Delaware Application April 20, 1934, Serial No. 721,535 7 Claims. The present invention relates to improvements in machines for cutting,` stamping or embossing sheet material: and particularly to improvements in the organization and construction 5. of the platen or block upon which the material, usually in sheet form, is supported. The purposes of the invention are, among others, to obviate certain serious defects which are present in the usual or ordinary platen constructions, to increase the life and eiectiveness of the platen, to insure better and more eicient results, and to increase the life of both the platen and the dies or knives. The invention has been perfected in connection with clicking machines for cutting blanks from sheet rubber such as employed inthe manufacture of shoe soles from rubber stocks, heels or the like, but it is not necessarily limited to such use and may be extended to other and analogous fields and for cutting and embossing, all sorts of materials. The usual form of platen or cutting, block consists of a resistant plate or surface, usually of metal which is backed up with a padding oiY some sort. For this purpose layers oi solid rubber pulp and paper layers have been employed, but these have not proven satisfactory as the material does not yield uniformly over the entire area or becomes permanently. deformed. resulting in uneven wear, uneven cutting4 results and excessive deterioration of the cutting surface and cutters. By the improved platen con-` struction these objections are overcome, and more even and uniform` cutting is secured, the f knives or dies and platens have longer life, the speed of the machine is increased and other desirable results are secured; In the drawings andL in this specification the best known and preferred form of the invention is shown, but it will be specifically understood that the form and proportions illustrated are non-essential and may be varied Within the range contemplated and secured in the appended claims. In the drawings, Figure 1 is a general perspective view of a cutting or clicking machine such as is used in the preferred embodiment of the invention; Figure 2 is an enlarged cross-section through a platen such as is employed in connection with the invention; Figure 3 is a similar view of another form of platen; Figure 4 is a face view of the preferred form of yielding block used in connection with the platen bywhich the best and most accurate. results are secured; Figure 5 is a section onthe line 5,--5 of Figure 4; and Figure 6 is a sectional view through ar platen such as used in embossing or stamping as distinguished from cutting. In Figure 1 of the drawings a; clicking machine of any usual or preferred form is showny comprising a base I and a head 2 towhich a gang cutting die 3 isattached;` the platen isV indicated at 4. Theseelements are suchV as are usually found in a machine of this type and is unnecessary as` any detailed description standard `or preferred form of machine may be employed. In the particular form illustrated in Figure 2 the platen is composed of an upper or cutting surface consisting of a series of tempered steel plates 5, 5 which are supported upon an intermediate steel plate 6 and'which is in turn supported upon the yieldingv pad or cushion 1. This assembly is mounted upon the platen member ofy the press. as will be understood'. The superior results obtained by my cutting block are due to the conception of a yielding cellularv pad', made of rubber as the. material. best adapted for. thev purpose. The requirements for this type ofA pad. or backing are suchV as havek called for extensive experimentation and trial. in arriving at. a pad suitable for the purpose, but it will. be understood and appreciated that, having explained the best form of pad knownl to me, those skilled in the art may be able to develop vsubstitute pads within the purview of my'invention. The details as tothe' size and location of the cells: orA voids inl the pad' aifect the results secured. The pad should have the property ofV yielding uniformly over the whole cutting area and should on the other hand be suiciently stable to maintain its form and effectiveness under rapidly repeated blows delivered in the operation of the machine. The use of these machines is usually very severe and the characteristics of the pad must be made to respond to these rigid requirements. One form of pad illustrated is of appreciable thickness (one form of pad which has been employed by me being approximately of an inch) and is made of a tough high grade rubber stock such, for example, as might be employed in tire treads. The under surface 8 of the pad is continuous, an-d the body of the pad is formed with many cells or voids which allow for the iiow of the rubber when impact is applied thereon. The yielding of the pad is secured by the iiow of rubber into these voids rather than by deformation of the pad. In the form shown in the drawings, these cells or voids are substantially hexagonal and arranged in honeycomb form, being separated by continuous and unbroken ribs 9 of appreciable thickness. These ribs taper upwardly so that their enlarged bases rest upon'and are united integrally with the base 8. The purpose of tapering the ribs is to give increasing stability to-them as they approach the base by which they are prevented from spreading. The pad thus has sufficient stability to resist the constant and repeated blows and to enable the pad to recover instantly therefrom for the next impact. This uniform distribution of the cells or voids gives a uniform yielding quality to the entire surface of the platen. It will have the same yield at all points and will not become deformed, lumpy or irregular, as has been'the casewith 'allprevious'types of padding with which I am familiar. As lthe pad is integral throughout and every rib or projection tied to and supported by the adjacent ribs and connected integrally with a continuous base, the pad performs the work'required of it without any of the objections inherent in other pads, and lasts practically indefinitely. Y In the form of ycuttingblock shown in Figure 3 a single tempered steel plate l2 is employed in place of the composite plate shown in Figure 2. In Figure 6, in which theinvention'is shown as employedin an embossing press, the upper surfaceof the platen is composed of a softer yielding matrix plateM supported upon a spring steel intermediate plate l5 which is in turn supported upon the pa-d l. Y The abovedescription and drawings are to be takenas explanatory of the invention merely for the reasons given above. It will be understood that where a cutting platen is Vreferred to in the several claims, the intention Lis to .cover vthe similar` oranalogous Yuse in theembossing iield in which the requirements are substantially the same. . Although the pad has been illustrated and described with the base portion VV8 underlying the ribs 9, it is not limited to this particular manner of use A.and conveniently may be reversed so that continuous portion 8 overlies the ribs 9, in which position said continuous portion 8 assistsin distributing locally applied loads.` The thickness of continuous portion 8 and ribs 9 may be altered toY conform to various conditions of use to which the pad vmay be put,Y and other modification may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims. What is claimed is:I l Y A 1. A cutting block comprising an upper platen member providing a cutting surface resting upon a backing member of rubber, said backing member being resilient throughout its entire body and having a plurality of voids into which the surrounding rubber will flow to permit yielding of the body of the pad throughout the cutting area thereof. 2. A cutting block comprising an upper platen member providing a cutting surface supported upon a backing member of rubber, said backing member being homogeneous throughout and having a plurality of voids distributed uniformly to permit yielding of the body of the pad uniformly throughout the cutting area thereof by flow of the rubber into the voids, and a base on the pad integral therewith. 3; A cutting block comprising an upper platen member providing a cutting surface resting upon a backing member of rubber, sai-d backing memberY being homogeneous throughout having a plurality of voids distributed to permit yielding of the body of the pad throughout the cutting area by ow of the rubber into the voids, the body comprising a plurality of upstanding tapered elements. 4. A cutting block comprising an upper platen member providing a cutting surface resting upon a backing member of rubber of a uniform character throughout, said backing member comprising an integral base and a web of ribs extending therefrom, forming a plurality of uniform voids over the cutting area. 5. A cutting block comprising an upper platen member providing a cutting Vsurface supported upon but unattached to a backing member of rubber of a uniform character throughout, said backing member comprising an integral base and a web of ribs extending therefrom, forming a plurality of uniform voids over Vthe cutting area, said ribs tapering away from said base. 6. A cutting .block comprising an upperY platen` memberV providing a cutting surface supportedv upon a backing member of rubber, said backing member comprising an integral baseand a web of ribs extending therefrom and forming a plurality of hexagonalvoids of uniform size uniformly distributed throughout the cutting area. LA cutting block comprising an upper platen member providing a cutting surface supported upon a backing member of rubber, said backing member comprising an integral base and a web of ribs projecting therefrom and forming a plurality of hexagonal voi-ds of uniform size uniformly distributed throughout the cutting area, the ribs tapering toward their f ree margins. ' GLENN B. BRITTON.

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Cited By (2)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    EP-2062704-A1May 27, 2009Mayr-Melnhof Karton AGCounter cutting die and die cutting device
    US-2628681-AFebruary 17, 1953Kane GideonWeb perforating mechanism